Graham Nash & Electromagnetic Stim for Vets’ PTSD

Here is the press release for Graham Nash’s Gallery Opening last Saturday.

I so appreciate HIS appreciation of my Veterans Stress Release CDs. I have lectured twice at the Annual Combat Stress Conference and my science-based power point presentation was well received— about the CDs, and about acupuncture and the Pulsed Electromagnetic Field Stimulator (PEMF)— FDA approved for depression and pain/inflammation.
Another speaker’s talk was titled: “Dead in Bed” about the thousand+  20 yr.-old vets coming home and having fatal heart attacks—with the only common link being too many prescribed drugs… and being stamped ‘suicides’ and ‘overdoses. It is a huge scandal, since two of the drugs that the military has spent  1  1/2 billion on have been shown to be ineffective for PTSD and to have negative cardiac effects…
Why don’t we just outgrow War instead…
Kathleen

For Immediate Release:

Contact: Michael Jensen or O’Ryan McKinney at 626-585-9575, mj@jensencom.com or oryan@jensencom.com

GRAHAM NASH DEBUTS NEW PHOTO ASSEMBLAGES AT “THIS COULD BE YOU,” A SOLO EXHIBITION OPENING SEPTEMBER 1 AT GALLERY 169 IN SANTA MONICA WITH AN ARTIST’S RECEPTION FROM 5-8PM

 

PROCEEDS FROM ARTIST’S RECEPTION WILL BENEFIT

 VETERANS FOR PEACE   &  VETERANS STRESS RELEASE CDS

 

Los Angeles, CA, August 20, 2012: Graham Nash has helped shape the world around him through ideas, innovations, and influential works of art for more than four decades.  A legendary singer-songwriter, Nash is also an internationally renowned photographer and digital imaging pioneer whose work is represented—by a classic 1969 portrait of David Crosby—in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.  Nash’s latest exhibition of photography, “This Could Be You,” opens September 1 at Santa Monica’s Gallery 169 (ww.gallery169.com). There will be an artist’s reception from 5-8PM.

 

Widely known as an activist in support of causes related to social justice, peace, environmental stewardship, and progressive politics, Nash addresses these issues in the twelve (12) previously un-exhibited, large format photo assemblages comprising “This Could Be You,” also the title of one of the works.  Each hand-embellished mixed-media piece examines and questions contemporary political events and societal mores. 

 “I believe that knowledge is power, that information and ideas are vital to our very survival, that our many problems should be faced, and can be dealt with,” says Nash.  “As an artist, I need to reflect my concerns regarding certain aspects of society facing me today.  I want to express my personal opinions about what goes on around me.  My intent is not to alienate, but to engage.  No one has to agree with me, but let’s keep an open mind.  After all, this could be you.”

 A portion of proceeds from sales from the opening reception of Nash’s work at Gallery 169 will benefit the  Veterans For Peace Los Angeles (www.veteransforpeacela.org) for the Veterans Stress Release CDs created by Dr. Kathleen Rosenblatt.  

Currently, Nash is touring the U.S. with Crosby, Stills and Nash.  CSN 2012, a 25-song set presenting the group’s first live performance film in more than 20 years, was released earlier this summer.  Captured in high-definition during the early portion of CSN’s 2012 world tour, the set is available worldwide from CSN Records in Blu-rayDVD/2CD (3 discs), and Digital formats.

Born in Blackpool, England, Nash was appointed OBE by Queen Elizabeth in 2010.  He first rose to fame with British Invasion hit makers The Hollies, and went on to form Crosby, Stills & Nash in 1968.  Nash has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame twice, and is in the Songwriters Hall of Fame.

 With his photography, Nash has exhibited worldwide.  His work is collected in the book Eye to Eye: Photographs by Graham Nash; he curated others’ work in Taking Aim: Unforgettable Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs Selected by Graham Nash.  In 1990, he established Nash Editions, now one of the world’s top photographic printmaking houses—and recognized by the Smithsonian Institution for its role in the invention of digital fine art printing.

 

www.grahamnash.com

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